Featured News

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Decommissioning IU Health Bloomington Hospital on Second St

The current IU Health Bloomington Hospital, located at 601 W. 2nd St, will turn off its lights on Sunday, Dec. 5 following the move to the new IU Health Bloomington.

“December 5 is going to be a very busy day as our teams work to transport patients from the current facility over to the new IU Health Bloomington,” said Brian Shockney IU Health South Central Region President. “It’s an exciting time, and a time of reflection as we decommission the legacy site that has meant so much to the community we serve.”

Decommission and demolition work will start on Monday, Dec. 6 in preparation to turn the land over to the City of Bloomington.

This decommissioning process for the current facility will include building a fence around the property, which is expected to be installed starting in mid-November. The fence is constructed for the safety of the neighborhood and community around the site.

IU Health Bloomington Hospital has provided care to Monroe and the surrounding counties since its inception as Bloomington Hospital in 1905. We look forward to continuing this legacy at the new IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center.

About Indiana University Health
Named among the “Best Hospitals in America” by U.S. News & World Report for 23 consecutive years, Indiana University Health is dedicated to providing a unified standard of preeminent, patient-centered care. A unique partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine – one of the nation’s leading medical schools – gives our highly skilled physicians access to innovative treatments using the latest research and technology. Learn more at www.iuhealth.org.

 

Mock Move to the New IU Health Bloomington a Success

IU Health Bloomington Hospital’s practice move to the new IU Health Bloomington on Thursday, Oct. 28 came with chilly weather, and 174 team member participants ready for whatever the day would bring.

Using four LifeLine ambulances and a transport van, they worked to move a large handful of volunteer patients from the existing hospital on Second St. across town to Discovery Parkway.

Throughout the morning exercise, IU Health team members were relaying the latest information to identify what worked and what could use some improvement. Cheers from the team were heard when the last patient reached the new hospital. The last patient arrival signaled a successful and exciting mock move exercise.

It will be all-hands-on-deck in a few weeks as thousands of statewide team members collaborate behind the scenes to transfer patients to the new hospital on Sunday, Dec. 5. And between now and then, the teams will continue planning and preparing to make the big move as seamless as possible.

Stay up-to-date with news about the new IU Health Bloomington at iuhealth.org/bloom-build and on our IU Health Bloomington Hospital Facebook page.

About Indiana University Health
Named among the “Best Hospitals in America” by U.S. News & World Report for 23 consecutive years, Indiana University Health is dedicated to providing a unified standard of preeminent, patient-centered care. A unique partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine – one of the nation’s leading medical schools – gives our highly skilled physicians access to innovative treatments using the latest research and technology. Learn more at www.iuhealth.org.

 

 

Fall Property Taxes

The Lawrence County Treasurer Jody Edwards reminds you that the fall installment of property taxes is due Wednesday, November 10th.  The Treasurer’s Office is open to the public.  You may pay in person with cash, check or money order. You also have the option to pay by credit card by calling the toll free number below or using the tax payment website.  Current tax and credit card payment information may be found online at www.lawrencecounty.in.gov/government/treasurer.

Tax payment toll-free number: 1-888-654-3143 (property number required & fee applies)

Tax payment website: https://lawrencecounty.egovpayments.com (Fee applies)

You will also have the option of using one of payment drop boxes. One will be located before the security desk and another past the security desk, outside of the Treasurer’s Office door. Remember that if you choose to come to our office, you will need to go through the security screening.  If you choose to use the drop box option, please place your payment coupon along with your payment in an envelope, along with contact information in case we need to contact you.

Office hours: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Phone: 812-275-2431

Address: 916 15th Street, Room 27, Bedford, IN 47421

Questions regarding your assessment should be directed to the Assessor’s Office at 812-275-5405; regarding your tax rate, exemptions or deductions to the Auditor’s Office at 812-275-3111 or regarding your tax payment to the Treasurer’s Office at 812-275-2431.

 

Opening the doors to the new IU Health Bloomington

IU Health is proud to announce that the new IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Academic Health Center will open its doors on Sunday, Dec. 5.

“I can’t say enough about the teams who have made this happen,” said IU Health South Central Region President Brian Shockney. “Even with the challenges brought forward by the pandemic, we’ve persevered because we know this building will have a positive impact on our community.”

With valet parking, a LEED Silver Certified designation, and all private patient rooms—the new IU Health Bloomington is another step forward in providing great  healthcare to Monroe and the surrounding counties. .

The new IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center “was designed not just for today, but for the next 100 years,” said Shockney. “Our teams put a lot of research into what makes a hospital have both a healing environment while providing top-of-the-line clinical care.”

The private rooms have been built with special material to help reduce noise from the hallways and nearby rooms. And the team has integrated an adaptive acuity model of care that brings care to the patient, thereby reducing the need to move patients around the hospital for different services.

“With 622,000 square-feet and 364 patient beds, IU Health Bloomington is actually a bit larger than our current facility,” said Shockney. “But even with the new walls, the same team is here to give expert care to our friends, family, and neighbors.”

Learn more about the new IU Health Bloomington at iuhealth.org/bloom-build.

For video follow this link: https://youtu.be/aYxpOqP8_7A

About Indiana University Health
Named among the “Best Hospitals in America” by U.S. News & World Report for 23 consecutive years, Indiana University Health is dedicated to providing a unified standard of preeminent, patient-centered care. A unique partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine – one of the nation’s leading medical schools – gives our highly skilled physicians access to innovative treatments using the latest research and technology. Learn more at www.iuhealth.org.

 

Crane Army cuts ribbon on two state-of-the-art facilities, modernizing munitions readiness for Joint Force

Uniformed Army leaders and Civilians ceremonially opened two new facilities at Crane Army Ammunition Activity on Thursday, September 2. A state-of-the-art plating shop and centralized receiving building are now operational and providing munitions readiness to the U.S. military from South-Central Indiana.

The two military construction projects have been a long time coming for Crane Army, with more than a decade of design, funding and construction having gone into the process. To have two projects complete at roughly the same time is almost unheard of for Army ammunition depots, making the ribbon cutting ceremony especially exciting for Army Materiel Command’s overarching modernization strategy.

“This ribbon cutting is about more than just opening another building. It’s about how our Army is undergoing its greatest transformation in more than 40 years,” Gen. Ed Daly, commanding general of U.S. Army Materiel Command, said. “It’s about how we’re executing a 15 year, $16 billion plan to modernize the organic industrial base. It’s about our ability to surge quickly and match the speed of competition, crisis and conflict. And it’s about ensuring our warfighters have the munitions they need to fight and win.”

CAAA’s plating shop features automated lines to chemically treat steel, aluminum, stainless steel, copper and brass surfaces. Alongside upgraded equipment and automated processes, Crane Army consulted with surface finishing industry experts to develop a state-of-the-art facility that vastly improved safety for the workforce and the environment.

“The new plating shop has a production capacity three times the parts per shift of the previous facility, not only improving the rate at which the team can support warfighters but also eliminating the need for a double shift.,” Brig. Gen. Gavin Gardner, commanding general of Joint Munitions Command, said. “It exceeds the industry standard for plating facilities and was designed to be expanded in the future to continue adapting to meet warfighters’ needs.”

The new receiving building is CAAA’s first-of-its-kind centralized facility, used primarily for receiving inbound shipments of ammunition and explosives. The building features in-house bays for inspection and quality assurance along with nearby storage facilities in order to eliminate transporting shipments of munitions to multiple facilities on base – saving Crane Army time and money, while also decreasing risk to the workforce.

“While we’ve spent a few years building shiny, new facilities on the installation, we’ve also worked hard to modernize the ways that we keep our people safe,” Col. Santee Vasquez, commander of Crane Army Ammunition Activity, said. “From implementing robotic lines to upgrading equipment and personal protective equipment, we intend to maintain our workload at Crane Army while also improving the quality of life of our workforce.”

 

 

Lawrence County Community Foundation Announces

 Recipients of 2021 Impact Grants

The Lawrence County Community Foundation Board of Directors awarded over $59,000 in Impact Grants to sixteen local agencies through the 2021 LCCF Open Grant Cycle.  Earlier this summer, LCCF awarded Boost Grants totaling $18,450 to eleven organizations through the 2021 Open Grant Cycle.

The Community Foundation is governed by a volunteer board whose mission is to improve the quality of life in Lawrence County for this generation and generations to come.  The Community Foundation accepts and manages individual and business contributions made to permanent endowments, some of which fund the annual grant cycle.

The 2021 Impact Grant Cycle was funded by the Ralph W. “Shorty” & Bette Robison Fund, David Allen Jacobs Community Fund, Bicentennial Fund, Smithville Charitable Foundation Fund, Earlyn & Alvera Burkhart Hill and Orlin & Imogene Burkett Memorial Fund, William A. Poling Fund for Lawrence County, Patrick & Sharon Robbins Fund for Lawrence County, Sargent Family Fund, Dollens Fund, Chloral Hilderbrand Community Grants Fund, Jim & Annette Seib Community Fund, Harold “Mac” & Shirley McReynolds Fund, Hoosier Hills Credit Union Community Fund, Bob Bridge Fund, Brett Terry Community Fund, Bedford Federal Savings Bank Community Fund, JoEllen (Alhorn) Lee Community Fund, Ferguson Community Fund, German American Bancorp Fund, and the Paul & Patty Ford Community Fund.  Additional funding was provided by the Lawrence County Community Foundation Education Fund, the Morris D. Norman Fund, and the M. Jeanette Norman Fund.

Grant checks totaling $42,302 were distributed at an open house Thursday at the new office (3315 W. 5th Street).  An additional $17,300 was awarded as challenge grants to LOOP (City of Mitchell), Fayetteville Community Lions Club, and Green Hill Cemetery Association. A challenge grant provides matching funds, helping organizations gain awareness and raise funds for their mission.  Once the challenge amount is raised, the grant check is presented to the organization.

Barbara Terry chaired the LCCF Grants Committee this year, “The grant applications received were from a wide variety of non-profits in Lawrence County. It is great to see that these organizations have survived the pandemic and are intent on continuing to provide services which might not otherwise be possible for Lawrence County and its residents.” Terry added “The generous financial support of the citizens of Lawrence County makes this grant process possible.”

The Lawrence County Community Foundation is a public charity recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) whose mission is to be proactive in creating and growing an enduring source of charitable assets, and to identify and respond to the changing needs of Lawrence County.  For more information contact Hope Flores at (812) 279-2215 or hope@cfpartner.org.

Grant recipients and project names follow:

Bertha’s Mission Meal Prep
Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence County Whatever it Takes!
Christian Women’s Connection CWC Helping Hands Community 2021
First Christian Church of Bedford Bringing Accessibility to Camp Bedford
Hope Resource Center Sibling & Fatherhood Program Classes
Kappa, Kappa, Kappa; Gamma Epsilon Chapter 2021 Candlelight Tour of Spring Mill Park Buses
Knights of Columbus, Council 1166 Adaptive Playground
Lawrence Co. Cancer Patient Services Port-able Shirts
Lawrence Co. Cancer Patient Services Patient Care
Lawrence Co. Foster Support Group Foster Family Christmas Party
Lawrence Co. Prosecutors Office Serving our Survivors
Marion Township Rural Fire Department EMS Division Operations Update
Shawswick VFD Fire Pump
White River Humane Society Fixing Fine Felines
 
Challenge Grants:  
LOOP – City of Mitchell ADA-Compliant Pool Ramp
Fayetteville Community Lions Club The Red Barn Roof Replacement
Green Hill Cemetery Association Green Hill Cemetery Entrance Repairs

Hope Resource Center Lisa, April Haskett, Barb Terry

Foster Family Support Lisa, Steve Gilstrap, Barb Terry

WRHS Lisa, Buddy Hendricks, Nina Peterson , Barb Terry

 

Start On A Road To Healthier Habits For Men’s Health Month

Patches, gum, hypnosis, and sheer willpower are just some of the ways people try to quit tobacco. In honor of Men’s Health Month, help encourage the men in your life to make tobacco cessation a priority.

“Studies have shown that men may be at greater risk for some tobacco-related conditions because they use certain products more than women,” said Patricia Colon, MPH, CHES®, IU Health Community Health Tobacco Prevention Coordinator. “But overall, tobacco users have increased risk for premature death and health issues including cardiovascular disease and cancer.”

The data is telling, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting that an estimated 34.1 million American adults currently smoke cigarettes.

The CDC website also offers a worrying statistic saying, “Cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease, disability, and death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths every year, or about 1 in 5 deaths.”

And while all smokers are at risk of increased health issues, please help encourage the men in your life to quit smoking in honor of Men’s Health Month.

“The FDA says, ‘Men who smoke are at risk for heart disease, cancer, lower respiratory diseases, stroke, and diabetes—the first, second, fourth, fifth and sixth leading causes of death among men in the United States in 2015,’” said Colon. “Help decrease your risk and quit tobacco for good.”

The Indiana Tobacco Quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW) offers free, evidence-based help to tobacco users to quit and stay quit. Visit QuitNowIndiana.com to find out more.

About Indiana University Health
Named among the “Best Hospitals in America” by U.S. News & World Report for 23 consecutive years, Indiana University Health is dedicated to providing a unified standard of preeminent, patient-centered care. A unique partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine – one of the nation’s leading medical schools – gives our highly skilled physicians access to innovative treatments using the latest research and technology. Learn more at www.iuhealth.org.

 

LCCF Awards $18,125 for Grants for Disadvantaged Elderly

The Lawrence County Community Foundation announced the 2021 grant recipients from the Margie Marie Pennington Fund for Elderly; the awards ranged from $1,624 to $4,000.  The Pennington endowment was created to assist organizations with programs impacting elderly in Lawrence County, Indiana, that are disadvantaged or homeless.

Endowments, such as the Margie Marie Pennington Fund, are perpetual. Although Pennington passed away several years ago, her legacy will go on forever in Lawrence County through the grants issued from the endowment.

“If people direct assets to permanent endowments in their wills, then they, too, can have an impact forever,” Hope Flores, CEO of the Community Foundation said. “One that goes on long after they’re gone. The Lawrence County Community Foundation can help you serve your community, whatever your interests are.  An endowment fund may benefit a field of interest or specific charities or causes serving Lawrence County.”

“The best part of Margie’s gift is that it will only continue to grow over time”, Flores added.  “Although Margie is gone, her gift to the community foundation will continue to meet the needs of Lawrence County disadvantaged or homeless elderly forever.”

The Lawrence County Community Foundation is a public charity recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) whose mission is to be proactive in creating and growing an enduring source of charitable assets, and to identify and respond to the changing needs of Lawrence County.  For more information on leaving your legacy in Lawrence County contact Hope Flores at (812) 279-2215 or hope@cfpartner.org.

The 2021 Pennington Grant recipients and projects include:

Bertha’s Mission Meal Delivery/Elderly Disadvantaged
Christian Women’s Services Senior Pennington Grant 2021
Hoosier Hills Food Bank Supplemental Food Purchasing – Lawrence County
Hoosier Uplands Appliance and Home Repair for Elderly
Law. Co. Cancer Patient Services Ensuring to Boost Well Being
White River Humane Society Every Senior Needs a Friend

 

Lawrence County Community Foundation Announces 2021 Boost Grant Recipients

The Lawrence County Community Foundation (LCCF) Board of Directors awarded Boost Grants totaling $18,450 to eleven organizations through the 2021 LCCF Open Grant Cycle.

“We’re excited to announce our first Boost Grants,” Lisa Starr, CFP Finance and Grants Officer, shared. “These grants offer expanded flexibility for smaller projects and smaller organizations.  Due to COVID restrictions, we posted videos explaining our new grant programs.  After watching the videos, applicants chose which grant would be the best fit for their organization.  These Boost Grants will touch a wide variety of needs, from raptor education to a food closet for food-insecure teens.”

The 2021 Boost Grants were funded by the M. Jeanette Norman Fund, Patrick & Sharon Robbins Fund for Lawrence County, William A. Poling Fund for Lawrence County, Paul & Patty Ford Community Fund, LCCF Education Fund, Jim & Annette Seib Community Fund, Robbins Humanitarian Fund, and the Morris D. Norman Fund.

The 2021 Boost Grant recipients and projects include:

Bedford Public Library Color Walk: Outdoor Fun and Fitness
Friends of Spring Mill State Park Restoring SMSP’s Root Cellar & Spring House
Hoosier Uplands Mitchell After School Site STEM Supplies
Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry “Meat” the Need
Indian Creek VFD Safety
Law. Co. Comm. Corrections Life Lessons
Law. Co. Econ. Growth Council High School Equivalency Tests
Marshall Township VFD Scene Safety Lighting
Mitchell Community Schools MJHS Food Closet
Pleasant Run VFD Safety by Light
Raptors Rise Rehabilitation Ctr. Raptors 101

The Lawrence County Community Foundation is a public charity recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) whose mission is to be proactive in creating and growing an enduring source of charitable assets, and to identify and respond to the changing needs of Lawrence County.  For more information about making a forever gift to benefit Lawrence County, contact Hope Flores at (812) 279-2215 or hope@cfpartner.org.

 

Munitions transportation training a win-win for reserve Soldiers; Crane Army Civilians

Each summer, roads through Naval Support Activity, Crane are bustling as Army Reserve and National Guard convoys of military vehicles rumble across the installation to rendezvous points with Crane Army Ammunition Activity workers. Like clockwork, the vehicles get loaded or unloaded with shipments of munitions as part of Operation Patriot Press, a nationwide training event for Army transportation units conducted by Army Materiel Command to improve readiness and total force integration.

The training event allows for Soldiers enlisted as motor transport operators to drive long haul distances and transport classified loads of munitions across the country. It’s also an opportunity for Crane Army and other ammunition depots across Joint Munitions Command to showcase their readiness to ship and receive munitions quickly and accurately.

“Soldiers are actually able to do their jobs during Operation Patriot Press,” 1st Lt. Michael Shoop, OPP liaison officer from the 246th Transportation Battalion, said. “It’s great experience for our newcomers and returning Soldiers to come to Crane Army to practice driving longer distances and doing onload and offload procedures. It gets them away from their home station after a year of COVID-19 and back doing what they love.”

The 1742nd Transportation Company from the South Dakota Army National Guard was one of a few units who got to train at CAAA in 2020 before the COVID-19 pandemic forced other units to cancel their OPP exercises. This year, the unit was back at Crane completing their annual training requirements for 2021.

The 1742nd returned to Crane Army after spending a year maintaining readiness while implementing COVID-19 mitigations in their training. Though the unit was able to complete requirements like weapons qualification and field training exercises in a manner compliant with South Dakota’s COVID-19 guidelines, the Soldiers desired missions more relevant to their military occupational specialty, especially as new Guardsmen joined the unit and needed experience.

“Working with CAAA adds so much value to our company, especially its retention, by giving our Soldiers hands-on, real-world mission-related experiences,” Capt. Rebecca Linder, Company Commander of the 1742nd, said. “Our Soldiers feel the importance and value of this mission – they take it just as seriously as the depots do.”

Nearly 300 Soldiers in transportation units moved through NSA Crane while transporting classified munitions from depot to depot. More companies will head in Crane Army’s direction

 

IU Health Bloomington EMS Headquarters Breaks Ground

IU Health Bloomington broke ground on a new emergency medical services (EMS) headquarters on Friday, June 4.

Brian Shockney, IU Health South Central Region president, was joined by members of the IU Health EMS team, design and construction partners, and other members of the IU Health community to celebrate this step towards making Indiana one of the healthiest states in the nation.

“We are excited to begin this construction of our new EMS headquarters, which further strengthens our emergency response network—providing excellent care and service not just to Monroe County, but many communities we serve in this region,” said Shockney.

Construction on the 19,300-square-foot facility, led by Pepper Construction Company, begins this month and is set to be complete in December 2021. The new facility will be located near the IU Health Bloomington Administrative Office Building near the intersection of Curry Pike and State Road 46.

With easy access to Interstate 69, the building is designed specifically for this team and the important work they do in providing emergency care to individuals in need in the local and surrounding communities.

Watch this video to see highlights from the event: https://bcove.video/3pkMFnl.

About Indiana University Health
Named among the “Best Hospitals in America” by U.S. News & World Report for 23 consecutive years, Indiana University Health is dedicated to providing a unified standard of preeminent, patient-centered care. A unique partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine – one of the nation’s leading medical schools – gives our highly skilled physicians access to innovative treatments using the latest research and technology. Learn more at www.iuhealth.org.

 

Lawrence County Tourism
2021 Grant Program Deadline Approaching

Lawrence County Tourism is pleased to announce the continuation of a successful grant program that will provide funding to Lawrence County attractions, festivals and events. The program encourages the development of events that will contribute positively to the growth of tourism in the area. Completed grant applications will be accepted through June 30, 2021. Applicants must be organizations seeking to produce and promote a well-defined tourism-oriented attraction, festival or event within the boundaries of Lawrence County.

These funds are meant to help qualified organizations promote tourism activities that will directly increase hotel occupancy and create a positive economic impact for Lawrence County. The guidelines focus on four main points: the ability to draw visitors from outside of Lawrence County, the potential for growth of the event, generation of overnight stays, and the potential for food and beverage sales throughout the community. Grant applications will be judged by a committee of Lawrence County Tourism Commission staff and Board of Directors based on criteria outlined in the application materials. Grant application deadline will be June 30, 2021 for events taking place later in the year.

“Lawrence County Tourism has distributed over $308,000 in funds to local attractions and event organizers since 1994,” says Tonya Chastain, Executive Director of Lawrence County Tourism. “It’s helping our attractions, festivals and events attract more and more visitors, and drawing attention to Lawrence County and the outstanding resources in our community.”

Grant applications are available at the Lawrence County Visitors Center located at 533 W Main St. in Mitchell. Anyone with questions about the program may contact Lawrence County Tourism Executive Director Tonya Chastain, 812-849-1090, tchastain@limestonecountry.com.

 

COMMUNITY FOUNDATION PARTNERSHIP RECEIVES

IU HEALTH COMMUNITY IMPACT INVESTMENT GRANT

Community Foundation Partnership, Inc. is pleased to announce it has received an $85,000 grant from Indiana University Health’s Community Impact Investment Fund to support relief and recovery efforts within Lawrence County to alleviate continued impacts resulting from the coronavirus pandemic.

The Community Foundation is partnering with several local non-profits in this effort, including:

  • Southern Indiana Center for Independent Living– to assist at-risk Lawrence County residents with critical housing aid such as past due rent or utilities and repairs essential to remain living in a safe environment
  • Lawrence County Trustees– to assist at-risk Lawrence County residents with critical housing aid such as past due rent or utilities and repairs essential to remain living in a safe environment
  • Lawrence County Economic Growth Council– to train unemployed or under-employed Lawrence County residents in locally desired skills and attributes which will help them secure employment
  • Becky’s Place– to assist shelter residents enter the workforce

As the COVIID-19 pandemic and the effect it was having on our community became apparent in 2020, CFP took a leadership role in providing rapid relief through our Emergency Relief Grants. CFP partnered with the United Way of South Central Indiana to provide over $320,000 in grants to schools and non-profits to address our communities’ most pressing needs in Lawrence and Martin Counties. With the grant from IU Health, CFP will continue these efforts by assisting Lawrence County move into a stage of recovery.

Hope Flores, CEO of the Community Foundation Partnership, said, “It is our pleasure to work with IU Health and other organizations to strategically fund projects and programs that have deep, meaningful impact within the communities we serve.”

If you would like to contribute to Community Foundation Partnership grants that benefit local, charitable causes, mail your contribution to: CFP, P.O. Box 1235, 3315 W. 5th Street, Bedford, IN 47421.  For more information, call the Community Foundation office at 812-279-2215.  Visit our website at www.cfpartner.org. Like us on Facebook.

In 2018, Indiana University Health, through the IU Health Foundation, established a $100 million Community Impact Investment (CII) Fund to support mission-based projects and programs designed to address social determinants of health that have the potential to negatively affect the communities Indiana University Health serves.  To learn more about this fund, please click here. 

 

21 LC CII Group Photo, Joe Timbrook, Lisa Starr, Corrina Hayes, Missy Tackett, Hope Flores, Millard Jones

 

PRESS RELEASE

The Lawrence County Community Foundation is now accepting online applications for the 2021 Open Grant Cycle.  Over $75,000 will be available for charitable programs and projects that serve the residents of Lawrence County.  Over $25,000 in additional funding is available for specific causes such as parks, disadvantaged children, and senior citizens.

The 2020 Open Grant Cycle awarded almost $84,000 to twenty-eight Lawrence County groups and agencies including the Marion Township Rural Fire Department, Green Hill Cemetery, White River Humane Society, and the Christian Women’s Connection Helping Hands Project.  The 2021 cycle is funded by the David Allen Jacobs Community Fund, Ralph W. “Shorty” & Bette Robison Fund, Paul and Patty Ford Community Fund, Harold “Mac” & Shirley McReynolds Fund for Lawrence County,  Jo Ellen (Alhorn) Lee Community Fund, Ferguson Community Fund, Sargent Family Fund, Hoosier Hills Credit Union Community Fund, Earlyn & Alvera Burkhart Hill and Orlin & Imogene Burkett Memorial Fund, German American Bancorp Fund, Dollens Fund, William A. Poling Fund for Lawrence County, Bicentennial Fund, Patrick & Sharon Robbins Fund, Chloral Hilderbrand Community Grants Fund, Jim & Annette Seib Community Fund, Bob Bridge Fund, and the Bedford Federal Savings Bank Community Fund.

The Community Foundation has made changes to the online application process; grantseekers should watch the videos posted on the Lawrence County Community Foundation website prior to submitting an application.  The videos may be found by clicking on  https://www.cfpartner.org/grants-how-to-apply. Grantseekers must register and be approved to apply; the application deadline is April 12, 2021, to be considered for funding.

Non-profit organizations recognized by the IRS as having 501(c)(3) status, educational institutions, and governmental entities are eligible to apply.

 

LCCF Now Accepting Applications for Non-Traditional Scholarships

The Lawrence County Community Foundation (LCCF), a Partner in the Community Foundation Partnership, Inc., is accepting applications for non-traditional scholarships. Non-traditional scholarships are available to students who postponed pursuing secondary education one or more years after graduating from high school. LCCF will offer the following non-traditional scholarships:

The Bedford Elks Ladies Marie Disbennett Scholarship is available to a male or female student currently enrolled in or accepted to an accredited college, university, or technical school after at least a one-year period of time since high school graduation.

The Walk with Excellence Returning Women’s Scholarship is available to a female student currently enrolled in or accepted to an accredited college, university, or technical school after at least a one-year period of time since high school graduation.

The Amalie Ford Barger Scholarship is to provide scholarships for qualified Lawrence County students attending Oakland City University Bedford Campus. Preference will be given to female students returning to school after a period of time, especially those who have returned to school after raising a family.

Applicants must be a current resident of Lawrence County, Indiana, who has lived here for at least one year prior to applying for the scholarship and who maintains a local, permanent mailing address.

Application deadline is April 5, 2021

Additional information regarding these non-traditional applications and access to the online application can be found at our website www.cfpartner.org under scholarships.

 

Crane Army Celebrates Long Legacy of Serving the Warfighter

For 80 years hardworking Hoosiers here have diligently supported the defense of our nation through many wars and conflicts. Crane Army Ammunition Activity is proud of its role in this legacy of service and has faithfully provided munitions to our men and women in uniform whenever and wherever needed following its own founding in 1977.

Since being established and assuming the mission of providing munitions readiness to all the services, Crane Army played a major role in supplying warfighters with the materials they needed to succeed overseas during wide-ranging hostilities such as the Gulf War, the Bosnian War and the War on Terror.

“The exceptional ability of our people to meet the urgent needs of the warfighter sets Crane Army apart,” said CAAA Deputy to the Commander Norm Thomas, who has worked with Crane Army for 38 years. “They go out and excel at it every day. Every one of them steps up and handles their duties with passion.”

“I find it very fulfilling to know what we do at Crane Army supports our warfighters and protects our country,” said Vickie McKibben, the lead depot operations supply system analyst for CAAA. “It has been rewarding to see folks over the years come here and grow and learn about how much we do for the warfighter and realize they’re contributing to the security of our nation.”

For example, CAAA employees worked tirelessly to meet the short deadlines required by surging troops during Desert Storm in 1991. During the Gulf War Crane Army was responsible for supplying nearly 50,000 tons of ammunition and shipped hundreds of rail and truck loads over a short period of time.

“We had a big push in our ability to get materials out the door and items out for shipment, but we didn’t just meet the deadline,” Thomas said. “We simultaneously improved our out-loading processes as we shipped munitions out, resulting in an incredible revitalization in the face of a challenge.”

Ten years later Crane Army also reorganized its production and demilitarization missions under a new manufacturing and engineering directorate. The manufacturing and engineering workforce has since found new and innovative ways to produce, demilitarize and refurbish munitions and conventional ammunition for the Army. Manufacturing and engineering is currently involved in a range of projects from the production and renovation of pyrotechnic flares, bombs, artillery, charges and bursters to demilitarization processes where munitions are destroyed in ways that preserve materials so they can be recycled or reused. These salvaged materials can sometimes be put to immediate use like in CAAA’s white phosphorous plant where rounds are converted to phosphoric acid.

“My work finding and brainstorming ways to safely destroy or take apart unserviceable munitions, and working with other engineers to make them come to life, makes it so that the storage space we have can be filled up with usable munitions,” said Robin Hart, a planner and estimator for manufacturing and engineering who has worked with CAAA since 1980. “Through our demilitarization we can make a difference in funding too. I have seen how jobs get funded and equipment is purchased based on the recycling we are able to do.”

CAAA proved its dedication once again in 2003 during Operation Iraqi Freedom. CAAA temporarily shut down production lines so that employees from all directorates could focus solely on shipping munitions to support the mission. Crane Army employees worked around the clock, seven days a week, until the mission was complete to ensure the thousands of tons of munitions Crane Army supplied were in the hands of the warfighter when they needed to be.

“During Operation Iraqi Freedom we supported several missions but during one in particular, uniformed soldiers came and worked side by side with our folks,” McKibben said. “To see them working side by side in the cold and the dark and doing what it took to get the munitions ready to go out; it was inspiring and it sticks out in my mind as one of my favorite memories.”

CAAA has a proven history of delivering unmatched munitions when they are needed but Crane Army has never stopped looking forward for more ways it can help the warfighter succeed. Crane Army remembers and respects its past but continues to modernize to determine the most efficient ways of providing the best possible munitions in the years ahead.

“We are going to see a focus on modernization,” Thomas said. “There’s this incredible appetite to fund and pursue modernization, not just in our amazing facilities, processes and equipment, but in the people that make Crane Army the unmatched force that it is.”

The most significant factor in Crane Army’s storied history is the hardworking men and women who have contributed to its mission and continue to make it what it is today. Their dedication to their nation and to each other has and will continue to make CAAA one of the premier munitions providers for our armed forces.

“People ask me why I stay and all I can tell them is I love what I do and I love who I work with,” said Hart. “The relationships I have with my team are so important.”

Crane Army Ammunition Activity produces and provides conventional munitions in support of U.S. Army and Joint Force readiness. It is part of the Joint Munitions Command and the U.S. Army Materiel Command, which include arsenals, depots, activities and ammunition plants. Established Oct. 1977, it is located on Naval Support Activity Crane.

 

1942 (Click on Photo Above for more Info)

1977 (Click on Photo Above for more Info)

1991 (Click on Photo Above for more Info)

 

 

Robert E. Lee, II, Memorial Scholarship Applications due April 5, 2021

The Lawrence County Community Foundation (LCCF), a Partner in the Community Foundation Partnership, Inc., is currently accepting applications for the Robert E. Lee, II, Memorial Scholarship.

Applications are open to graduating seniors of Bedford North Lawrence High School who have been accepted by a post-secondary program. Students must be active in their school and/or community and be deserving of financial assistance. Application can be found www.cfpartner.org. The deadline for completed applications is April 5, 2021, 3 p.m.

The Robert E. Lee, II, Memorial Scholarship was established to honor the memory of a vital member of the Lawrence County community.  As a local businessman, County Coroner, volunteer, husband, father, and friend, Robert Lee embodied a uniquely open and generous spirit that touched many lives.

Robert’s untiring work in and for the Bedford community is legendary.  He donated his time and talents to youth organizations, service clubs, and local committees and boards with boundless, positive energy with the belief that the greatest gift you can give another is to make them feel good about themselves.  Robert’s voracious appetite for life, his genuine concern for friends and neighbors, his sense of adventure, and his integrity, made him so dearly loved by his family, friends and community.

In that spirit, the Robert E. Lee II Memorial Scholarship seeks to recognize a young person who embodies a similar ethic and has demonstrated a willingness to serve others.

Lawrence County Tourism
2021 Grant Program Deadline Approaching

Lawrence County Tourism is pleased to announce the continuation of a successful grant program that will provide funding to Lawrence County attractions, festivals and events. The program encourages the development of events that will contribute positively to the growth of tourism in the area. Completed grant applications will be accepted through January 31, 2021. Applicants must be organizations seeking to produce and promote a well-defined tourism-oriented attraction, festival or event within the boundaries of Lawrence County.

These funds are meant to help qualified organizations promote tourism activities that will directly increase hotel occupancy and create a positive economic impact for Lawrence County. The guidelines focus on four main points: the ability to draw visitors from outside of Lawrence County, the potential for growth of the event, generation of overnight stays, and the potential for food and beverage sales throughout the community. Grant applications will be judged by a committee of Lawrence County Tourism Commission staff and Board of Directors based on criteria outlined in the application materials. Grant application deadline will be January 31, 2021 for events taking place later in the year.

“Lawrence County Tourism has distributed over $300,000 in funds to local attractions and event organizers since 1994,” says Tonya Chastain, Executive Director of Lawrence County Tourism. “It’s helping our attractions, festivals and events attract more and more visitors, and drawing attention to Lawrence County and the outstanding resources in our community.”

Grant applications are available at the Lawrence County Visitors Center located at 533 W Main St. in Mitchell. Anyone with questions about the program may contact Lawrence County Tourism Executive Director Tonya Chastain, 812-849-1090, tchastain@limestonecountry.com.